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Pilot Congratulates Passengers for Finishing All the Booze on Board a Three-Hour Flight

Pilot Congratulates Passengers for Finishing All the Booze on Board a Three-Hour Flight


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A plane full of Raiders fans displayed championship drinking abilities

A sports journalist on-board said they weren’t “particularly rowdy,” surprisingly.

You’ve heard of a party bus? Well, how about a party plane? Passengers aboard a recent three-hour-and 20-minute Southwest Airlines flight from Oakland to Kansas City were personally congratulated by the pilot for drinking all of the alcohol on board.

The occasion? The plane was packed with Raiders fans who were gearing up for the big game against the Kansas City Chiefs.

The unusually boozy flight was brought to the attention of the media by sports journalist Jimmy Durkin, who live-tweeted his experience.

Announcement on flight to Kansas City congratulates the entire aircraft for wiping them completely out of booze. Yep, it's a Raiders flight.

— Jimmy Durkin (@Jimmy_Durkin) December 7, 2016

Durkin then confirmed that the plane was not packed with the Raiders themselves, but rather exuberant fans of the team:

Thought most knew this, but I'm not on the team plane. Media doesn't fly with the team. https://t.co/zb60uuIB9v

— Jimmy Durkin (@Jimmy_Durkin) December 7, 2016

“Not particularly rowdy,” Durkin told The Telegraph. “A decent amount of folks in Raiders gear. Pretty standard fare for a flight to a city where the Raiders are playing.”

The flight back was probably pretty solemn, in contrast, because the Raiders lost that game 21-13.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.


  • Feathering system increases drag and slows the craft for re-entry
  • Simply unlocking spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them
  • But aerodynamic forces caused brakes to be applied automatically
  • Virgin says it will fly first customers 'within 18 months to two years'
  • Company added it will begin testing a new craft by the end of 2015

Published: 17:01 BST, 28 July 2015 | Updated: 21:35 BST, 31 July 2015

The fatal crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year occurred when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's tail wings early, which led to it breaking apart as it passed through the sound barrier.

An official report into the crash found the resulting aerodynamic forces caused the brakes to be applied automatically without any further action by the crew.

Investigators at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said no safeguards were built into system to overcome the error of the co-pilot.

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last year was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft's braking system early, according to a report released today

WHAT CAUSED THE CRASH?

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.

The feathering system helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

Simply unlocking the spacecraft's brakes shouldn't have applied them.

However, investigators said that might have happened anyway as a result of aerodynamic forces.

The resulting stress may have contributed to the spacecraft's destruction.

In October, SpaceShipTwo - a plane designed to run the first ever passenger flights into space - split into pieces as it fell to Earth over California's Mojave Desert.

Wreckage rained from the sky as one pilot managed to eject from the cockpit, while the other, left strapped to his seat, plummeted to ground and died.

NTSB officials said early in the investigation that the co-pilot prematurely unlocked equipment designed to slow the descent of the spacecraft during initial re-entry.

The vehicle's tail wings are designed to move when the spacecraft hits a certain speed, in a maneuver known as 'feathering.'

This maneuver helps to increase drag and slows the spacecraft down for re-entry.

The NTSB report found that co-pilot Michael Alsbury unlocked the feathering system early at Mach 0.92 instead of the intended speed of Mach 1.4.