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Joey Restaurant Opens in Palm Springs

Joey Restaurant Opens in Palm Springs


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This intimate new bistro debuts on Palm Canyon Drive

The name “Joey” is a reference to “Pal Joey,” the 1957 film starring Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak, and Rita Hayworth.

Joey Restaurant, from owners Vince Calcagno (former co-owner of San Francisco’s Zuni Café) and Joe Lucero, has opened in downtown Palm Springs.

This bright and lively eatery offers a daily-changing menu for both breakfast and lunch in the desert. The intimate spot has a delightful, open and airy atmosphere with indoor and al al fresco patio seating. Stay tuned for dinner service to launch this Fall.

The breakfast menu includes coffee drinks made from Equator Coffee & Teas; baked eggs with polenta; organic egg casserole with caramelized onions; yogurt with housemade granola; fruit bowl; smoked salmon with your choice of bagel; orange currant scones with honey mascarpone; and a variety of pastries and fresh juices.

Lunch dishes include a croquet monsieur, curried chicken salad sandwich, egg salad tartine, a hummus and avocado tartine, strata casserole, charcuterie platter, mesclun and faro and butter lettuce and avocado salads.

The name “Joey” is a reference to “Pal Joey,” the 1957 film starring Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak and Rita Hayworth.

Joey is located at 245 South Palm Canyon Drive.

For more Los Angeles dining and travel news, click here.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


Wealthy Sweet’N Low magnate Donald Tober leaps to his death from NYC apartment

[Editor&aposs note: This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)]

A wealthy 89-year-old artificial sweetener magnate who made Sweet’N Low a household name has committed suicide by jumping from his Park Avenue apartment building, law enforcement sources told The Post.

Donald Tober, CEO and co-owner of the New York-based 1,400-employee Sugar Foods, leapt to his death just after 5 a.m. Friday, and was found in the courtyard of the luxury Upper East Side building between 65th and 66th streets, the sources said.

He was struggling with Parkinson’s disease, the sources said.

At the helm of Sugar Foods, Tober turned the company’s flagship product, Sweet’N Low, and its ubiquitous little pink packets, into a mainstay on kitchen counters and restaurant tables across the country, along with Sugar in the Raw and N’Joy nondairy creamer.

Donald Tober and Susan Gutfreund during the Casita Maria's 2019 Fiesta at The Plaza on Oct. 15, 2019, in New York City. (Getty Images)

�sically, we’re concerned with everything that surrounds the coffee cup,” Tober told Restaurant News in 1995. “We’re tightly focused.”

By the mid-�s, some 80 percent of foodservice establishments used Sweet’N Low the sweetener also commanded more than 80 percent of the sugar substitute market, Restaurant News reported.

𠇍onald IS Sweet’N Low,” the president of Sugar Foods, Steve Odell, told the magazine.

𠇍on’s had as much to do with building Sweet’N Low into a household name as anyone ever has with a product. Every packet of Sweet’N Low sold today can be traced back to a single sales call that he probably made or at least had a part in.”

Odell told The Post he was Tober’s business partner for 51 years.

“He was bigger than life,” Odell said. “He made everybody feel special — everybody. He’s an icon and he’ll always be.”

Tober was fighting a �vastating” disease, 𠇎specially for someone as active as he was,” Odell added.

Still, the suicide was a shock.

“I talked to him yesterday and certainly, no. There was no indication whatsoever.”

A Harvard Law School grad, Tober was a former chairman at The Culinary Institute of America and a founder of City Meals-on-Wheels.

He was the husband of Barbara Tober, who worked for three decades as editor-in-chief of Brides magazine and was a former trustees board chair at the Museum of Arts and Design in Manhattan. The couple lived on the building’s 11th floor.


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