New recipes

15 Small Symptoms That Could Signal Something Serious Gallery

15 Small Symptoms That Could Signal Something Serious Gallery


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Not to freak you out, but these symptoms are kind of a big deal

istockphoto.com

15 Small Symptoms That Could Signal Something Serious

istockphoto.com

If you have an annoying cough or a headache, it’s easy to brush it off like it’s no big deal. We experience these innocent little symptoms all the time — an ache here, a pain there, some other strange feeling… These symptoms tend to disappear quickly; going to the doctor every time you experience one would rack up quite the list of medical bills.

Even still, some people can’t help but freak out at every tiny potential sign. They’ll get a headache and scour the internet for signs they have cancer. They’ll find a freckle and assume it’s melanoma. That kind of worrying will drive you bonkers — and could really worsen your anxiety.

It’s helpful to know what to look for and when there’s actually a reason to be alarmed, so you don’t have to flip your lid every time you get a muscle cramp. Often, symptoms can be alleviated with something simple, like making sure you drink enough water or getting more of nutrients you’re missing from your diet. But there are some symptoms that, while they seem benign, could signal something serious.

Always Tired

istockphoto.com

After a few full nights of sleep, you shouldn’t be waking up feeling exhausted. If this happens to you, consider what other reasons for fatigue might be to blame. In rare cases, however, waking up feeling exhausted could mean something is interrupting your sleep. Sleep apnea occurs when you periodically stop breathing throughout your sleep cycle, causing your body to jolt awake. Restless leg syndrome can also interrupt your normal circadian rhythm.

Bruising Easily

istockphoto.com

If you keep finding dark splotches of black and blue on your skin without explanation, tell your doctor right away. This easy or excessive bruising can be an early indicator of leukemia. The low platelet count of their blood makes leukemia patients even more susceptible to bruising. If your bruises aren’t healing, that could signal something else serious, such as a hematoma that needs to be drained or a vitamin deficiency. People who aren’t eating enough sometimes experience this symptom because their blood isn’t receiving the nutrients it needs to heal internal wounds.

Dizziness

istockphoto.com

Don’t freak out every time you get a little lightheaded. Causes of dizziness that aren’t so serious could be hunger, a head rush, or intense forms of exercise. Dizziness could also signal dehydration — drink some water if you feel dizzy or experience these other warning signs. But if you regularly experience dizzy spells, it could be a sign of an iron deficiency, heart problems, or an inner ear problem.

Dry or Itchy Skin

istockphoto.com

Liver damage often doesn’t present any symptoms until it becomes severe. At that point, a person may experience jaundice, wherein their skin becomes tinted yellow, and have to be hospitalized. One early symptom, however, is itchy skin. Dry or itchy skin is usually a result of your body trying to tell you something. It can also indicate high blood pressure, which, if caught early, can be lowered by avoiding certain foods to avoid future heart trouble.

Excessive Sweating

istockphoto.com

Don’t break a sweat over nothing — everybody perspires. But if you always seem to be drenched, regardless of the temperature or your levels of anxiety, it could be time to ask for a medical opinion. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma can cause excessive perspiration, as can some other serious diseases.

Forgetfulness

istockphoto.com

Everyone forgets things now and then. Names are hard to remember! But if you’re usually pretty savvy with recalling everything on your to-do list but suddenly struggle to keep everything in mind, you might want to consider telling your doctor about it. Forgetting small things can be an early sign of a thyroid problem; people with hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, report feeling fuzzy and forgetful prior to treatment. Other symptoms, such as unusual variations in sleep and emotions, usually occur alongside this one.

Having Trouble With Math

istockphoto.com

If math just wasn’t your subject in school, don’t rush to tell your physician. But if you’re usually a whiz at counting tips and calculating totals, but recently run into roadblocks every time you try, you might reconsider. Struggling with simple math or forgetting numbers are early signs of Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. To stave off brain degeneration that leads to these diseases, eat more of foods that could help preserve your cognition.

Hearing Loss in One Ear

istockphoto.com

Hearing loss as you age is normal, especially if you listen to loud music in headphones or work in an environment with excessively loud noises. However, if the hearing loss is inexplicably concentrated in one ear, it could be a sign of a slow-growing tumor called an acoustic neuroma. As they grow, these tumors — while not cancerous — can cause balance and coordination problems.

Ice Cravings

istockphoto.com

Really wanting to chew ice isn’t just any old weird craving — though those often have logical explanations, as well. Craving the crunch of ice cubes is a symptom of an iron deficiency, called anemia. Make sure you are getting enough iron from your diet by eating lots of leafy greens and other iron-rich foods. You might also consider taking an iron supplement.

Leg Pain

istockphoto.com

Unless you injured yourself, experiencing leg pain while you walk is nothing to stroll past unnoticed. Does the pain seem to emulate from the bone? That could be an early sign of osteoporosis, which many people with calcium deficiencies experience later in life. It could also signal bone cancer, which is less predictable.

Skin Rash

istockphoto.com

Skin rashes are common and it’s crazy how many different types there are. Your rash could be anything from an allergy to a heat reaction. Pay attention to the size and shape of the rash — that can tip you off to whether it’s something to be concerned about or not. If the splotches don’t disappear or appear to be growing, talk to a medical professional. Certain rashes, such as those that appear circular and expand, are a sign of Lyme disease, for example.

Swollen Toe

istockphoto.com

If you’d stubbed your toe, you’d remember — that experience is painful, every time. Without an injury to explain it, a swollen toe is a reason to take a trip to your doctor. Your puffy toe could be an early symptom of gout, which is affiliated with other serious conditions such as high blood pressure and kidney disease.

Thinning Eyebrows

istockphoto.com

Though it might be nice not to have to pluck them all the time, your eyebrows thinning out isn’t really a good sign. For some reason, your body isn’t growing hair as quickly as it usually would. This could be caused by an underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism. Along with this symptom, patients often experience feelings of fatigue.

You Have a Mole

istockphoto.com

Not every mole is a cancerous one — but there are a few key characteristics to watch out for. The American Cancer Association advises watching closely for the ABCDE’s: you should be concerned if a mole is asymmetrical, has unclear borders, is a strange color, has an increasing diameter, or evolves over time. Your best line of defense against skin cancer is sunscreen — most people forget to apply sunscreen on these overlooked occasions.

Your Breath Smells Weird

istockphoto.com


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy


7 Signs Your Painful Mouth Sore Could Be Something More Serious

If you have a bleeding mouth sore or pain that lingers for more than a couple of weeks, don’t ignore it.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“We see patients all the time who had an irritation around their tooth that ends up being squamous cell cancer, which may have been bothering them for up to a year,” says ear, nose and throat specialist Brian Burkey, MD, MEd.

Some oral cancers are not obvious to us as we look in a mirror and can even be hiding behind the teeth or under the tongue.

“The good news is that when picked up early, these cancers are highly, highly curable,” says Dr. Burkey. “Early detection is key.”

Seven symptoms to look out for

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, which could signal medical problems or, in limited cases, oral cancer:

  1. Nagging mouth pain.
  2. Bleeding sore in the mouth that won’t heal and lasts for more than two weeks.
  3. Swelling in the neck that lasts for more than two weeks.
  4. An area in your mouth that becomes discolored and stays that way.
  5. A lump or thickening in your cheek that doesn’t go away.
  6. Numbness in your tongue or another part of your mouth.
  7. Constant feeling of something caught in your throat or a change in your voice that lasts longer than two weeks.

While not an exhaustive list, these are symptoms that can slip under the radars of our busy lives.

“That’s why it’s important to notice when they don’t resolve,” says Dr. Burkey. “If symptoms last for more than two weeks, get them checked out by a doctor or dentist.”

Regular oral cancer screenings are crucial

Besides watching for any symptoms, it’s important to get regular oral cancer screenings to catch problems at their earliest stages. Here, Dr. Burkey explains what you need to know — and what to expect:

Who does the screenings? Your dentist is often your first line of defense when screening for oral cancer, but oral surgeons and ear, nose and throat specialists can also perform screenings.

How often do I need a screening? While there are no official recommendations for screenings, it’s important to get screenings during your usual dental checkups, twice a year.

Do I need to request a screening from my dentist or are they routine? Screenings are generally part of your normal dental exam, but ask your dentist to do one if they haven’t.

How long to screenings take? Oral cancer screenings take less than 10 minutes. Your doctor or dentist will perform a visual screening and feel the tongue looking for abnormal color and firm lesions. You also fill out an information form so that the doctor or dentist can pay close attention to any specific areas of concern.

Do the screenings hurt? No, they are generally painless.

How to reduce your risk

Here are ways to lower your risk of getting oral and head and neck cancers:

  • Quit tobacco. About 90% of people with oral cancer use tobacco (smoking or chewing), and their risk increases with the amount and length of time they use. Tobacco is most closely associated with ‘oral cavity’ cancer specifically, which affects the mouth, including lips, teeth and gums.
  • Take precautions against HPV. There is a dramatic rise in oropharyngeal cancer, or cancer in the tonsil and base of tongue associated with the human papilloma virus (HPV). You can’t see this area yourself, so finding it requires an exam from an ear, nose and throat physician. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and is preventable with a vaccine and/or appropriate safe sex precautions, depending on one’s age.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation. Though less a risk factor than those above, alcohol use can also increase your risk of oral cancers.
  • Limit time in the sun. You want to protect your face to combat skin cancer, but in particular, don’t forget to protect your lips with sunscreen. They are often forgotten but they need protection too. If you work outside, try to avoid being in the midday sun. You should also wear a hat that shades your face whenever possible.
  • Good oral hygiene. Alongside getting your dental checkups twice a year, continue good oral hygiene at home by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. Talk to your dentist about which mouth rinse they recommend, especially if you have mouth sores.
  • Incorporate a healthy diet. Keeping your teeth health go beyond just brushing. The American Dental Association recommends having a diet filled with plenty of water, vegetables, whole grains, fruits and lean protein. Make sure to avoid sugary treats and snacks to help keep harmful bacteria away. ​

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy



Comments:

  1. Aeacus

    Your idea is great

  2. Neilan

    In my opinion, you are making a mistake. Email me at PM, we will discuss.

  3. Caldwiella

    You are wrong. Let's discuss.



Write a message