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Finding the Perfect Balance at Marina in Barcelona

Finding the Perfect Balance at Marina in Barcelona


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The northeast corner table at Marina, the terrace restaurant at the Hotel Arts in Barcelona, is a perfect geranium-enfolded vantage point for admiring the sweep of the Mediterranean through Frank Gehry’s transpicuous giant goldfish, a honeycomb waterfront sculpture designed not to block the view.

Enjoy it while you can, because once the food starts coming at this mid-March to November open-air lunch secret (dinners from June through August), you’ll be otherwise absorbed.

Marina (Coastal Food) is the full name of this easygoing multi-cultural space offering Mediterranean cuisine with Asian and Peruvian overtones. The myriad wait staff, uniformly ecstatic about something, is so attentive that the slightest flicker of an eyeball will bring them running, and they’re all so elegant and international that you’re tempted to beg them to sit down and tell you all about themselves.

But the tastes are the thing: A trilogy of ceviches from Peru, Acapulco, and Nikkei sets the tone. The Peruvian ceviche has baby scallops, sea bass, red onion, sweet corn, chile pepper, and coriander on a slice of sweet potato; Acapulco offers king prawns, sea bass, guacamole, tomato, and Cholula sauce; and Nikkei is wild salmon, tamarind, sesame, and smoked tuna. Each seems to catch the essence of its origins: one upland, another tropical, and the third Eastern.

The crab roll alone (deep-fried soft shell crab with lettuce leaves, jalapeño peppers, and tomatoes) is worth coming for, while the wok of beef tenderloin with shiitake mushrooms and bay vegetables is little short of wondrous: perfectly cooked chunks of beef, rare and melt-in-your-mouth tender, with a medley of baby vegetables ranging from bean spouts to carrots to snow peas, onions, and bok choy.

Tuna tartare is another nod to the East, Mediterranean blue fin tuna sprinkled with trout caviar on a bed of wakame, a Japanese seaweed and favorite miso soup ingredient, with seaweed bread.

The menu is organized into zany categories including “Boxes & Buckets” (buckets of boiled shrimp, boxes of grilled octopus, woks of beef), “Comfort Zone” (Caesar salad, club sandwich, steak-frites), “Bubbles and…” featuring Laurent-Perrier Brut (no, not H2º) with a mixed grill of calamari, scallops, clams, jumbo shrimp, razor clams, and lobster, or “B-Tween Breads” with wagyu hamburgers, tacos, wraps, Peking duck buns, and BLTs.

Desserts feature creations from Jordi Roca of the famous Celler de Can Roca brothers of 2013 and 2015 “Diners Club Best Restaurant in the World” fame (and also our No. 5 best restaurant in Europe). “Rocambolesco,” Jordi Roca’s line of designer ice cream emporiums in Madrid, the Costa Brava’s Platja d’Aro and (soon) Barcelona, offers a chocolate ice cream with a crust of nuts and crunchies, while Marina’s own cheesecake on a Graham cracker-like crumble topped with blueberries and peach jelly should probably be against the law.

The wine list is short but distinguished, ranging from a 60€ ($68) cava from Catalunya to a 350€ ($397) Dom Pérignon Champagne. The Rioja, Penedès, Pla de Bages, Burgundy, and Pays de France DOs are all represented, and the house white, Miquel Jané Sauvignon Blanc, is crisp and elegant.

Mixologist Diego Baud, who hails from Colorado, contributed a closing cocktail called “Smokin Razz.” It’s made with a Barcelona-born gin called Gin Raw and Lapsang tea with dried raspberries and a chamomile blossom floating in the surface froth — a fitting post-script to a beguiling blend of tastes and textures from around the globe, and a perfect analogy for Barcelona’s increasingly intercultural and intercontinental amalgam of cuisines.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.


What's the Ideal Coffee-to-Water Ratio?

We've got the so-called Golden Ratio for your morning cuppa.

Related To:

Photo by: Daniele Jesus / EyeEm

There are several variables that add up to making a delicious, balanced cup of coffee, including grind size of the beans, roast, water temperature and brew time. But the ratio of coffee to water is one of the most-important components. It’s not exactly one-size-fits-all, but there’s an easy formula for finding your ideal ratio. Here’s how to brew a cup of Joe at home like a pro.

Get to know the golden ratio

“The phrase ‘golden ratio’ implies that there's one perfect ratio for all coffee brewing, and it's just not quite that simple,” says Ben Helfen, an education support specialist for Counter Culture Coffee. That said, there are a few standard coffee-to-water ratios for various methods of brewing. For drip coffee brewing — which encompasses most home coffeemakers, bulk brewers and pour-overs — Helfen says that the ratio of 60 grams of coffee to one liter of water, or roughly 1:17, is the one most commonly used by coffee pros (and is often referred to as “the golden ratio”). For immersion brewing like a French press, where water sits with the ground coffee rather than passing through it, Helfen says that lower ratios in the 1:14 to 1:15 range are more ideal.

“When I'm dealing with coffees that are very different in roast level or variety type, I will make adjustments to things like the brew time and grind setting, but very rarely will I change my ratio,” Helfen says.

Jenny Bonchak, founder and CEO of Slingshot Coffee Co., explains that finding the perfect ratio is all about striking a balance between strength (how many coffee particles end up in your final brew) and extraction, or its intensity. As a rule of thumb, she recommends aiming for a 1:14 to a 1:16 ratio.

She explains that an average cup of coffee is 12 ounces, or 336 grams. So, if you're making one cup using the 1:16 ratio, you'd use 25 grams of coffee to 400 grams of water, which is a yield of approximately 12 ounces after accounting for water absorption. At home, she starts with a 1:16 ratio her go-to recipe to make coffee for two is 50 grams of coffee to 800 grams of water.

Weigh your coffee and your water

You’ll notice that pros talk about the amount of coffee in grams, rather than tablespoons or scoops. In order to more precisely measure your coffee, Bonchak recommends investing in a gram scale.

“One of the most-important pieces of equipment to have in your repertoire for a great cup of coffee is a gram scale,” she says. “All of us coffee pros wouldn't be without one. Weigh your water, weigh your coffee.”

The reason weight is so important when it comes to coffee is because of its density. “Lighter roasted coffees are more dense than darker roasted coffees, and certain types of varieties of coffee from some countries can be denser than others, even at similar roast levels,” Helfen explains. “Because of this, the same scoop size might weigh more or less depending on the coffee.”

Make sure your water temperature is right

After you find your ideal coffee to water ratio, you’ll need to pay close attention to water temperature. It’s vital to brewing a balanced cup because it plays a key role in the extraction process. Pros agree that your water temperature should be in the range of 195 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

“If your goal is a hot cup of coffee, but your water is not in that ideal range, you risk under-extraction and what can be perceived as grassy, peanut-y or paper-y” flavor, Bonchak explains. “On the flip side, you can over-extract with water that is too hot and experience flavors that are bitter and astringent.”

If you don’t have a thermometer, Helfen recommends heating your water to boiling and then letting it sit for a minute or two with the lid off.

Though Bonchak drinks her coffee hot at home, Slingshot has built its reputation on its stellar cold brew. The ratio of coffee to water is still a key factor, but with cold brew, you’re swapping in time for water temperature in the extraction process.

“Cold or room temperature water doesn't extract your coffee as quickly,” she says. “I recommend a more coarse grind, and brewing in a cold environment for 12 to 16 hours."

If you happen to brew a too-strong cup, don’t pour it out! Freeze it to use as coffee ice that won’t dilute your cold brew as it melts or incorporate it into recipes like these:

03_Chili_Light_023.tif

Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin ,Food Stylist: Rebecca JurkevichProp Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Con Poulos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Spicy Vegetarian Chili

Save 1/2 cup of your morning coffee to dump into this well-spiced meatless meal.

Aztec Spicy Chocolate Chocolate Cupcake FNK Silo

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Chocolate Aztec Cupcakes

This spice-laden recipe uses 1/3 cup of fresh-brewed coffee to up the chocolate flavor.

Is it chocolate? Is it salami? All we know is this adorable dessert includes a few tablespoons of coffee.



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