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Grand Opening: Knight’s Downtown

Grand Opening: Knight’s Downtown


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When I walked in at lunchtime the place was moderately busy with businessmen or older people. With clean, modern-but-not-too-modern décor and a large bar in the center of the room, the vibe said classy adult spot. But who says college kids can’t be classy?

Photo by Abbie Ginis

Knowing I wasn’t paying for the meal, and given that I didn’t really want a giant, heavy lunch, I went with a daily special: the broccoli and cheddar quiche.

Wait. You went to a burger place, on the owner’s dime, and didn’t even order a burger?????

Yeah, I know. It was dumb of me and I have felt uncomfortable about my decision from the moment I ordered. I just cannot resist a good quiche and they are hard to come by around here. We all have regrets.

Photo by Abbie Ginis

The food came quickly and the quiche was excellent. The broccoli was fresh and the crusty was the perfect amount of flakey. I was excited that the dish came with a fruit salad. Though my meal was satisfying and I was proud of myself for choosing a healthy lunch, I felt terrible that I didn’t try their famous burgers (which they grind themselves from beef from their own meat market).

I was eyeing the key lime pie on the menu but knew it wouldn’t be fair to ask him to buy me dessert, too. I’ll have to go back.

After I finished eating, Dan came over and chatted with me for a brief Q & A:

Q: Your twitter handle is @strongdrinks, tell me about that.

A: It’s our philosophy since the original location opened 30 years ago. Whereas a standard drink is a 1.5 oz pour our drinks are usually about 2.5 oz pour for basically the same price. We believe in giving our customers strong drinks.

Q: What do you say to Michigan students who aren’t looking to spend a ton of money?

A: I think you can definitely come here, have a burger and a beer and not spend more that $12, which is pretty reasonable for what you’re getting.

Q: What’s the most popular item on the menu?

A: The cowboy steak is our most popular steak, and the calamari and popcorn shrimp is a fan favorite as well.

Could Knight’s be the next Chop House of AA? Only time will tell – but this new spot is definitely a must-try.

View the original post, Grand Opening: Knight’s Downtown, on Spoon University.

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Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”


Delray Beach Market opens this weekend. Here’s what you can expect | PHOTOS

If you’re wondering what all the hubbub is in downtown Delray Beach on Saturday, it’s probably the opening of the Delray Beach Market. Florida’s largest food hall will give South Floridians another reason to hit the hot seaside town other than the popular dining/drinking enclave Atlantic Avenue.

The market is the newest, shiniest star on Florida’s cuisine scene. Foodies will be able to munch on everything from fresh baked pastries to empanadas, and healthy bowls to fried chicken at the 27 permanent vendor stalls (all indoors). There’s also a scratch kitchen delicatessen, a fish market stall and an upstairs lounge with a craft cocktails bar and a staging area for chef demonstrations.

After 10 a.m. opening remarks, doors open at 11 a.m. Saturday.

Coming in at 150,000 square feet and standing four stories high at 33 SE Third Ave., the food hub sits alongside the railroad tracks just a block south of Atlantic Avenue. The project has been in the works for three years at a cost of $60 million.

The vendors are mostly mom-and-pop food kiosks, says Craig Menin, the founder of Delray Beach-based Menin Development, which built the food hall.

“We didn’t want big chains,” Menin explains. “We didn’t want Starbucks. We didn’t want Shake Shack. Nothing against them, but the thesis is: We want people to come from a wide distance to come here. And if we’re only offering things that they can get around the corner, why would they?”

At a media reveal Thursday night, Raquel Chaiben of Ferdos Grille recalls that she didn’t fully grasp what a food hall was back when Menin’s president and general counsel, Jordana Jarjura, approached her family.

“I thought it was a magazine,” Chaiben says. “I’m like, ‘Oh yes, yes, I’ll talk to you next week.’ She’s like, ‘Raquel, come here. Let me explain what this is.’ I’m like, ‘Get out of here.’ ”



Comments:

  1. Cesare

    Cool, I liked it

  2. Cailin

    Looking what fuctioning

  3. Daibheid

    interesting! more of this

  4. Costica

    New items are always cool !!!



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